Issue 3

THE GENERATION ISSUE

Alice Carey
Anna Franceschini
Lizzie Fitch
Devin Blair
Kim Gordon
Annika Henderson
Melanie Bonajo
Marie Branellec
Elizabeth Orr
Holli Smith
Joke Robaard
Litia Perta
Marie Karlberg

Cover:
Alice Carey
Photography by Geoffrey Wheatley
and Sophia Wallace

Alice Carey

One day last Fall, we came upon the intriguing pictures of Alice Carey in Advanced Style, the blog of Ari Seth Cohen that features the extravagant breed of 60+ grand dames of New York. She was wearing a beautiful men’s tweed jacket that called for deeper investigation. A writer and style icon, Alice Carey has lived the majority of her adult life in the West Village of Manhattan, vacillating between the village and Cherry Grove, Fire Island, reputedly the nation’s first and oldest LGBT community. Alice and her husband Geoffrey Knox were deeply entrenched in the gay theatre community, politics, and culture of a pre-Stonewall, pre-AIDS New York. Alice casts a wide net traversing her impressions of a past era with liquid grace and charm.

Interview by Katherine Hubbard
Photo by Sophia Wallace

Lizzie Fitch

While residing in Paris last fall, we were amazed by the really fantastic exhibition Any Ever by Ryan Trecartin and Lizzie Fitch at the Musée d’Art Moderne. Their universum (Ryan as the image-maker, Lizzie as the set-builder and collaborator on their sculptures series) explores a shopping mall afterworld, where all kinds of props from our mainstream consumption world are given a totally new meaning. It’s really a brave new world, with all the roles reversed. Gender, generations, appearance, age, form and fiction all becomes one photosynthetic, kaleidoscopic rollerc-oaster. And what a ride it is. Lizzie, who’s entering her 30s and often works as a guest curator at DIS magazine, currently resides in a big house in Los Angeles, together with Ryan and a bunch of other collaborators.

Interview by Lauren Cornell
Photo by Ryan Trecartin

Annika Henderson on
meeting Kim Gordon

Annika Henderson – better known by her moniker Anika Invada – is a 25-year-old singer who grew up in Surrey, near London, and is currently based in Berlin. She studied political journalism in Cardiff, Wales, where she also moonlighted as a promoter of several music venues. By chance, she met Geoff Barrow – of Portishead fame – and ended up recording some songs with his group Beak. She released her debut album Anika in 2010. Her cover of Yoko Ono’s Yang Yang ended up being an underground club hit, with its subtle no wave intonations. Annika is a huge admirer of Kim Gordon, who she thinks still stands more or less alone as a jack of all trades, never trading in her integrity. An impression of Annika meeting Kim in Amsterdam, March 2012.

Words by Annika Henderson
Photo by Marianne Viero &
Eva-Fiore Kovacovsky

Elizabeth Orr

Elizabeth Orr is the daughter of the late Light and Space artist Eric Orr (1939-1998). Growing up in her father’s studio in Venice, Los Angeles, in the 80s, Elizabeth assisted him on many occasions and, after his death, helped augment his estate. And last year, she completed her documentary Crazy Wisdom. The Life And Work Of Eric Orr. But probably her biggest challenge to date came when she was invited to be part in the 2011 restaging of Guy de Cointet’s Five Sisters. The play embodies the 80s West Coast culture of health and beauty, and reads like a soap opera in which five sisters muse manically about plastic surgery, wardrobes, exotic holidays and sun tans. Eric Orr took care of both the set and lighting in the original play – the lighting plan acts as the main catalyst for emotion – and Elizabeth’s mum Peggy Orr played ‘Dolly’, one of the characters. For the 2011 edition, Elizabeth took charge of lighting; a double-take on her father and her own video installation work.

Interview by Jessica Gysel
Photo by Anna-Karin Loureiro

Note: On the left Orr is holding a poster she made in collaboration with artist Emma Hedditch. The poster is part of their performance series and is available for purchase. More information can be found here.

Holli Smith

Holli Smith is a hairstylist who’s been cutting the heads of New York’s finest queers for years. Kim Ann Foxman, Lizzie Trullie, JD Samson – all done by Holli. She learnt luxury styling by assisting Guido, one of the quintessential hairdressers of the OOs, yet didn’t shy away from learning a trick or two from barber shops. She also creates sculptured hair designs for editorial and commercial photo shoots for people like Hedi Slimane, Collier Schorr and Patrick Demarchelier – and loves to do the boys’ hair for shows by the likes of Patrick Ervell, Loden Dager and Christian Lacroix. We asked Emily Roysdon – premier feminist artist and longtime Holli client – to fire some questions her way.

Interview by Emily Roysdon
Photo by Collier Schorr